Making a Home Purchase Offer

Once you’ve found your dream house, it’s time to get started with the financial and contractual side of the purchase. Let your CENTURY 21® professionals guide you through this process. Purchase contracts vary in length and terms from state to state, and within a state, from locality to locality. Because you and the seller have different goals, rely on your CENTURY 21 agent’s experience and expertise. He or she can bring order and calm to the process and will know what questions you may not know to ask to help you reach a favorable outcome.

Multiple home purchase offers on the same home are not uncommon, so you may only get one chance to make an offer that the seller will consider. That's why it's important to think carefully about your strategy. In most cases it is better to have your real estate professional negotiate the offer. If you have any personal interaction with the homeowner, don't give out any information about your move, your current housing status, financial status or your feelings about their property - positive or negative. This could hurt you in future negotiations.

How Much?

Find out what other homes have sold for in the area, how much money you might have to put into repairs or renovations. These considerations factor in with how much you're comfortable spending.

Also, it helps to know the features that help or hurt resale. In some areas, a swimming pool actually detracts from a home's value and makes it harder to sell. In neighborhoods with two-car, attached garages, a single-car or detached garage may affect the home sale and future value.

In addition to sale prices for other homes, there are several ways you can determine a good amount to offer:

  • The condition of the house. Is the home in move-in condition, in need of paint and other cosmetic improvements, or a fixer-upper that needs some real work?
  • The market. If you are in a buyer's market — where there are more homes for sale than there are people to buy them — prices are probably stable or falling. If you are in a seller's market — where there are more buyers looking for homes than there are homes for sale — prices are probably moving upward.
  • Your ceiling. If you've gotten a credit pre-approval, you know how much you can borrow for your home purchase. Of course, you may not be comfortable paying as much as you've been approved to borrow, so think carefully about your financial situation before making an offer.

Next, decide how much you are willing to pay for a home. Remember, the advertised price of a house is just a starting point – it may take quite a bit of negotiating to arrive at a final cost.

Buying a Home With Cash

Though most buyers don't buy a home with all cash, anyone considering such a move may be wondering how. Because all cash buyers sidestep the time-consuming loan qualification process, the deal can close very quickly. The primary advantage of buying a home with all cash is completely avoiding mortgage interest. Buyers also save money that would be spent on loan origination fees, required appraisal , some closing costs and various other charges imposed by the lender.

At the same time, all-cash buyers should consider potential pitfalls of the transaction. Buyers who want to use the home as their primary residence lose out on many of the tax advantages available to homeowners with conventional loans.

If you can afford to pay cash but are concerned about price appreciation, you may be better off obtaining some financing. Also, look at other investments that are paying off and determine if spending cash on a home is worthwhile.

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